Happy Bottom Bikes Fat Tire | Mid-Drive | Electric Bike | Cargo Bike King

Fat Tire | Mid-Drive | Electric Bike

Fat Tire Mid-drive E-Bike

Most bicycles, and especially electric bicycles are manufactured in either Taiwan, China, Korea, Japan or Germany. This means about 95% of the bicycle parts we purchase in the U.S. are made overseas. The fat tire bike listed here is an exceptionally fine example of a value proposition, and priced well below any similarly equipped mid-drive E-bike.

This motor kit is an insane mountain climber, and the cowling surrounding the motor keeps it clean and acts as a heat sink to keep the motor running cool. It is also significantly more powerful than most hub motors, plus you have the added option of running a thumb or twist throttle in addition to the 9 power settings that act like both, a torque sensing style of riding and a cruise control, which essentially works very much like a cadance sensor. 

This mid-drive  E-bike sells for $1,997 plus tax if you live in California, and there is a $100 shipping cost to most anywhere in The Continental United States. Additionally, while supplies last we will include a BL800 LED Military grade, anodaized headlight  at no additional charge (See website headlights).    

Look closely at the pictures below. The powerful Bafang BBSO2 is housed inside of an elegantly designed cowling that further protects what is already a very robust and water resistant motor.   

Should you decide to go that extra distance we will provide an additional battery at our cost plus shipping and handling. At this time the battery is running about $320 give or take a few dollars.         

                         

BATTERY:  48V 11.6AH 468WH                       

DISPLAY: C965

MOTOR:  48V 750W                               

SENSOR: V12                                                    

CHARGER TIMES: 4-5HOURS                        

STEM: PROMAX ALLOY

CONTROLLER: 48V 25A BAFANG                    

FRAME: ALLOY 6061  Alloy

Saddle: VELO

SEAT POST: PROMAX ALLOY                   

FORK: ALLOY                                  

SHIFTING LEVER: SHIMANO ALTUS 8S

HEAD SET: VP COMPONENTS                      

  REAR DERALLEUR: SHIMANO ALTUS

CRANKSET:  46T*170MM                         

FRONT DERALLEUR: N/A

RIM:  Power double wall                         

FREEWHEEL:SHIMANO ALTUS 8S

HUB:  SHIMANO                                

TYRE: KENDA 26*4.0

BRAKE: TEKTRO DISC BRAKE                       

CHAIN: KMC Z51

FRONT LIGHT: N/A

BRAKE LEVER: WUXING

Bring on the e-bikes

2017-02-09


“Many who promote cycling have mixed feelings about e-bikes; many riders of regular bikes complain that “if you're able, save a little bigger piece of the environment and use your human power.” Now Tom Babin has a look at the issue in the LA Times. He notes that only 152,000 were sold last year in the US, “a figure that would be more than 5 million if Americans used them at the same rate as western Europeans.”

Tom lists the usual issues: crazy rules that don’t distinguish from scooters with vestigial pedals that are too big and too fast, and lack of good bike infrastructure. California has just changed its rules to separate low power pedelecs from the bigger faster scooters, which is needed all over North America. (In Europe, pedelecs are limited to 16 MPH and 250 watts, far less than you see on American e-bikes.) And attitudes are changing:

After years of consternation over mixing pedal and motor power, cycling advocacy organizations also are finally throwing their support behind e-bikes. Dave Snyder, the executive director of the California Bicycle Coalition, backed the state’s new legislation based partly on the idea that e-bikes help those who “just can’t ride as far or as fast as they need to.” 

The e-bike I recently borrowed from California company Elby drew curiosity from many people I encountered, especially from older riders who thought the machine would help them maintain their endurance and speed as they aged. It also, however, prompted a few upturned noses from those who consider themselves cyclists. “What’s the point?” one neighbor asked, falsely assuming the motor removed all the exercise involved in pedaling.

It doesn’t; a University of Colorado study looked at a group of new riders on pedelecs (electric bikes where you have to pedal for the motor to kick in). Result: “The researchers noticed improvements in the riders’ cardiovascular health, including increased aerobic capacity and improved blood sugar control.”

There is no question that pedelecs and e-bikes are less exercise, cost more money and there is a real concern that they are more dangerous than conventional bikes. But let’s stop bashing them; for some people, some cities and some commutes, they are a useful alternative for getting people out of cars and as this study shows, getting them healthier and fitter.

Babin concludes that “the biggest barrier now seems to be the outdated attitude that sees bikes only as a recreational athletic opportunity rather than a practical transportation option.” This seems to be the case in much of the English speaking world, where bikes are considered toys, not transportation.

As the population ages, and as bike commuters consider longer distances, e-bikes can be a boon. It is time to make them part of the solution instead of thinking of them as a problem.

 

Hard Tail | Fat Tire | Mid-Drive | Electric Bike, black as seen side on from the right
Fat Tire | Hard Tail | Mid-Drive | Electric Bike $ 1,897.00
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